Bull Run Battle

Gen. Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson figured prominently in two Confederate victories here. Also known as “Bull Run,” the First Battle of Manassas on July 21, 1861, ended any illusion of a short war. The Second Battle of Manassas, August 28-30, 1862, brought Southern forces to the height of their military power. The two battles are commemorated on this 5,000 acre battlefield park.

Confederate Casualties at First Bull Run (approximate) Beauregard and Johnston’s combined force of 30,800 had 390 killed, 1,600 wounded, and about a dozen missing, a total of approximately 2,000 or about 6.5 percent. Both sides suffered about the same number of killed and wounded.
Source: www.historynet.com/bull-run-casualties

 

https://www.battlefields.org/visit/battlefields/bull-run-battlefield

The Stone House was built to be both a wagon stop and a private residence, on the 2nd floor. As it was strategically located right across from the toll gate located on the new 1828 Warrenton Turnpike, it was used as place to rest, grab a bite to eat and enjoy some hard drinking before traveling down this marvelous private, paved road. In the early part of the 19th century, many goods were taken to cities by horse and wagon; driven by drovers and teamsters; the 19th century version of the 20th century truck drivers. The owners had living quarters on the second floor and did very well indeed for the 22 years that they owned it.

Starting in 1850, the next owners of The Stone House were Henry and Jane Matthews. Unfortunately, they were not as successful because of the building of the new railroad stop in the city of Manassas in the 1850’s, causing their road business to steadily decline. The Matthews family turned to farming corn, oats and hops to make ends meet. During the Civil War, the Matthews family found that the location of the Stone House was not an income enhancer, and down right dangerous.

In 1861 and 1862, they found that their Stone House and their farm property was swallowed up by the two battles of Bull Run. Despite the two invasions of wounded soldiers into their establishment, they held onto their property.

The Stone House became a field hospital for wounded men of both sides, because of its location.
Source: http://www.hauntedhouses.com/states/va/stone_house.htm

During Stonewall Jackson’s attack at Henry House Hill, the Confederate soldiers charged with their bayonets and screamed a terrifying high pitch battle cry that later became known as the “rebel yell.”

6511 Sudey Road
Manassas, VA 20109, USA

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